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FOOD SECURITY PROJECTS

8/4/2010
Greenhouses in the APIA Region
QTT is interested in establishing a community greenhouse and investigating using renewable energy to power the facility. Dana Osterback, Qagan Tayagungin Tribe's EPE IGAP Coordinator, has been pushing the project and derives some of her motivation from the successful greenhouse set up and operational in Nikolski.

The Nikolski project was the brainchild of former APIA employee Connie Fredenberg who brought a team of interested people and experts together for this project. Some funds and materials and all the labor was donated to the project. A wind-resistant geodesic dome greenhouse was installed a couple years ago, the beds were built and dirt was added last year. Now the dome greenhouse is producing a variety of vegetables and providing interesting and rewarding distractions for the residents of Nikolski.

Nikolski photoThe Sand Point project is expected to be larger; they are interested in a 30' x 96' Atlas Snow Arch (gothic style) hoophouse Quonset hut shaped structure which is reputed to be able to withstand hurricane force winds. In Sand Point they also plan to grow the produce utilizing their own soil and sowing crops in raised beds, but they will fertilize their crops with composted local nutrient rich material such as fish offal (guts) from the local fish processing plant, seaweed and grasses. A worm bin will turn newspaper, cardboard, and vegetable scraps into worm castings and compost tea for further enriching the soil. The initial crops will be things that are easy to grow and are most desired in the community: potatoes, carrots, leaf lettuce, cabbage, tomatoes, radishes, onions and some herbs. The Sand Point project is based upon developing self sufficiency and traditional values and offsetting costs of importing fresh veggies.

The community of False Pass has also shown interest in installing a community greenhouse. Our sister Aleut community in Russia, Nikolskoye, Bering Islands, has several greenhouses, and they raise potatoes in small gardens around the village. We could learn lots from our Aleut colleagues in Russia about self-sufficiency, gardening and operating a greenhouse in a tough, windy sub-arctic environment.

Links to Regional Food Security Projects

Nikolski Greenhouse Project


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